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A Contemporary Classic: The New Savage 110 Classic

A Contemporary Classic: The New Savage 110 Classic/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f3789feb807a_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f3789feb807a_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The new Savage 110 Classic brings an elevated level of versatility to the traditional wood-stocked hunting rifle. How The Savage 110 Classic's Stock Makes It A Modern Classic: Combines the customizability of a polymer stock with the classic look of walnut. Push-button controlled adjustable stock lets you tailor LOP and comb height. Each has 1.5 inches of play. Button tension can be increased or decreased with an Allen key. When polymer rifle stocks first emerged in the 1980s, they were viewed with skepticism and disdain by many hunters. It was argued that injection-molded plastic would never have the look and feel of traditional walnut. After all, wood-stocked guns have been serving hunters since the dawn of rifledom, and traditionalists saw no reason to change. The Savage 110 Classic features an oil-finish walnut stock that easily adjusts for comb height and length of pull, blending the versatility of a polymer stock with the look and feel of wood. As it turns out, polymer stocks do have some very real advantages over wood stocks: Polymers are tough, inexpensive and, perhaps most importantly, they make it very easy to customize a rifle to fit the shooter. Customizability + Classic Style Savage’s new 110 Classic bolt-action rifle manages to combine the customizability of a polymer stock with the classic look of walnut. At first glance, this rifle looks like a traditional wood-stocked rifle; a gun that will appeal to the traditionalist. Closer examination reveals that the walnut stock can be quickly adjusted to perfectly fit any shooter. The walnut stock features a comfortable pistol grip with a slight palm swell. The design is comfortable for shooters with various-sized hands, thus adding to the 110 Classic’s versatility. The principle that Savage uses to accomplish this is similar to what high-end shotgun companies have been doing with competition guns for years: Competitive shotgun shooting demands exact gun fit; and, decades ago, that required shooters to go through the difficult and expensive process of having the stock adjusted. Many modern competition shotguns have walnut stocks with adjustable comb heights and lengths of pull that allow the gun to be quickly customized to properly fit any shooter. Savage borrowed that technology and transitioned it to the rifle market. The new 110 Classic’s stock has two buttons on the right side of the stock that allow a shooter to adjust both comb height and length of pull by up to 1.5 inches. When the front button is depressed, the comb is released and can be raised, and three steel posts keep the comb secure and properly aligned. The center has cutouts that lock in place, and there are five adjustment points, each of which offers roughly a quarter-inch of adjustment. The Savage 110 Classic comes with a drop-out metal box magazine that holds four rounds (three in magnum calibers). The magazine release button is located in front of the magwell. The rear button controls length of pull in the same manner. Button tension can be adjusted using an Allen key. The adjustment buttons measure almost an inch wide, so they’re easy to locate and operate without taking your eyes off the target. And, the walnut stock has an oil finish that looks good and helps protect the wood. Features and Details In addition to its clever stock design, the Savage 110 Classic is a very versatile and well-built hunting rifle. It employs Savage’s proven dual-lug push-feed action with plunger-type ejector, and it also comes with the company’s user-adjustable AccuTrigger, which features a blade design to prevent impact discharges. The 110 Classic comes with Savage’s AccuTrigger. The design is exceedingly safe and user-adjustable from 1.5 to 6 pounds. The carbon-steel action and barrel feature a non-glare matte-black finish, and the sporter-profile barrel comes in lengths of 22 inches for standard calibers and 24 inches for magnums. All 110 Classic rifles come with a 9/16-28 threaded muzzle and include a thread protector. Other key features include a removable metal box magazine that holds four rounds (three in magnum calibers) and sling studs. Learn More About Savage Arms: Savage AccuFit : Putting Accuracy Within Reach Of Every Shooter Savage Introduces Prairie Hunter In .224 Valkyrie Savage 110 High Country Ready For The Backwoods MSR 10 Hunter : The Savage Way To Take Game The 110 Classic weighs in at around 8.1 pounds, which is fine for most hunting applications. Overall length for standard calibers ranges from 41.25 to 42.75 inches, depending upon length-of-pull adjustments, and the controls are easy to operate. There’s a three-position, tang-mounted safety that allows you to load and unload the rifle with the safety engaged, and the magazine release button is located at the front of the magazine well. Removing the bolt requires depressing a button on the front of the trigger guard and pulling the trigger. The 110 Classic is available in eight calibers ranging from .243 Winchester to .300 Win. Mag., all of which carry an MSRP of $999. Expectations Met… and Exceeded The 110 Classic I tested was chambered in .243 Winchester. I topped the rifle with a Trijicon AccuPoint 2.5-12.5x42mm scope. Removing the bolt for bore sighting or cleaning requires lowering the comb so the rear portion of the bolt doesn’t strike the stock. Once this was done, I reinserted the bolt and adjusted the comb height so that my eye was naturally aligned with the scope. The 110 Classic proved capable of sub-MOA accuracy with the three Federal loads tested. These included (left to right) Barnes 85-grain TSX, Berger 95-grain Hybrid Hunter and Nosler 90-grain AccuBond. The 110 Classic’s stock allows the shooter to adjust length of pull from roughly 12.5 to 14 inches, and because I have rather long arms, the rifle fit me best with maximum length of pull. Most other walnut stocks are built to fit the “average” shooter, so having the ability to customize the 110’s fit is a worthwhile feature. There’s no need to readjust your shooting position to make up for a stock that’s too short or too long, and the Savage allows the shooter to adopt a more natural shooting position. This increases comfort and also helps mitigate recoil. Savage has a stellar reputation for accuracy—thanks, in part, to its use of a barrel nut that allows for perfect headspacing. The 110 Classic utilizes Savage’s dual-lug push-feed action with a plunger-type ejector. The surface of the bolt has a jeweled finish. The 110 Classic not only lived up to those high expectations, it exceeded them, producing sub-MOA groups with all three of the .243 Winchester loads tested (Federal’s Barnes TSX 85-grain, Nosler AccuBond 90-grain and the new Berger Hybrid Hunter 95-grain). All three of the loads were extremely consistent, with group sizes ranging from .68 inch to 1.08 inches at 100 yards. Every load tested averaged under an inch, making this the most accurate Savage rifle I’ve tested. Impressive! Recoil isn’t much of a factor with a .243, but the 8-pound (10.1 pounds loaded and scoped) Savage 110 proved to be very easy to shoot. I have little doubt that the custom-fit stock improved accuracy. The 110 Classic features an American-style flat comb. When elevated, the rear portion of the comb rises above the line of the stock. As a result, it’s important to ensure no portion of your face is behind the elevated portion of the stock so the force of the rifle’s recoil doesn’t rake across your cheek (a mistake I made … just once). The AccuTrigger revolutionized bolt-action rifle production, and because it’s user-adjustable from 1.5 to 6 pounds, you can customize trigger pull weight. The test rifle came set at 2.5 pounds, which is just about perfect for my taste; however, if you want to adjust the trigger pull weight, it’s a simple process: Simply remove the action from the stock, and the trigger weight control screw can be adjusted clockwise or counterclockwise for a lighter or heavier pull. Like all 110s, the Classic features a tang-mounted safety that’s easy to reach and manipulate. The three-position design allows the action to operate with the safety engaged in the middle position. The adjustable stock and comb allow the shooter to get more comfortable when shooting from the bench, but this adjustability also helps when shooting from field positions. Prone shooting is popular because it affords the shooter maximum stability while hunting, but your ability to quickly and efficiently get into a prone position is compromised by the dimensions of your stock: If length of pull is too long, you’ll be reaching too short, and you’ll have to fire from a compacted position, which inhibits a relaxed, comfortable shot. The adjustable comb is also a benefit when shooting prone, because in really awkward positions (steep uphill, steep downhill, uneven terrain), the comb can compensate for unusual head positioning. Having the proper length of pull allows for faster shooting from kneeling or standing positions, and you can adjust it to compensate for heavy clothing. Normally, I shoot a rifle with a 14-inch length of pull, but in really cold conditions for which I’m wearing bulky clothes, having the option to shorten the rifle’s length to accommodate extra layers is a benefit. With 1.5 inches of comb adjustment, the Savage 110 accommodates a wide variety of shooting styles. It’s especially valuable when shooting from field positions. There’s nothing particularly fancy about the 110 Classic rifle, but it is a good-looking and well-executed gun. The walnut stock is rather plain, but the oil finish adds a touch of class. Wood-to-metal fit is pretty good throughout. The pistol grip is comfortably angled with a palm swell that allows for a firm hold on the gun, and the rounded fore arm is equipped with a finger groove. Both the fore arm and pistol grip feature Savage’s signature checkering with interrupting parallel lines. The action is fairly smooth, and the magazine fits neatly into the rifle without a lot of fiddling. The lone reliability issue came when a single cartridge popped free of the magazine— the rear portion riding atop the closing bolt, which caused obvious chambering issues. Aside from that, the gun performed well. Savage is breaking ground with the addition of an adjustable walnut stock, and I like the design. Sure, companies offer plastic spacers that allow you to manipulate length of pull, but the push-button design on the 110 Classic eliminates the need to remove the recoil pad when adjusting length of pull. The design certainly makes perfect sense when two or more hunters share a rifle, because, with just a few simple adjustments, a single gun can fit mom, dad and any kids in your house. The new 110 Classic offers traditionalists a wood-stocked rifle that doesn’t forfeit the versatility of a polymer stock. At $999, the Classic isn’t exactly a budget rifle, but it does shoot extraordinarily well. And, it’s one of the few guns that can instantly fit anyone who fires it. The article originally appeared in the September 2019 issue of Gun Digest the Magazine . We Found Bulk Ammo In Stock: Ammo from $14.60 creedmoorsports.com Ammo Sale from $6.99 brownells.com Disclosure: These links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group earns a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! NEXT STEP: Download Your Free Storm Tactical Printable Target Pack 62 Printable MOA Targets with DOT Drills - Rifle Range in YARDS This impressive target pack from our friends at Storm Tactical contains 62 printable targets for rifle and handgun range use. Target grids and bullseye sizes are in MOA. Ideal for long-range shooting! Get Free Targets

Give Me a Lever

Give Me a Lever

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d31c5aca_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d31c5aca_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The clean, flat receiver of the Mossberg Model 464, showing the beefed-up receiver rings. Yep, I said second try. Back in the mid-1970s, Mossberg introduced their Model 472 lever-action. Chambered in .30-30 Winchester or .35 Remington, the Model 472 was available in a number of configurations until being phased out altogether in 1983 with a final 5000-piece run of Roy Rogers commemoratives. Often encountered under the “Western Field” brand name, the Model 472 is remembered today mostly as a competent, respectable little carbine more than a little reminiscent of  Marlin's similar Model 336. Like the Model 472, the Model 646 is a competent, respectable little carbine. Mossberg insists that their new lever gun was already well under development when Winchester discontinued the sainted Model 94 in early 2006, but it's inevitable that the Model 464 will be seen as the Model 94's successor. In that role it succeeds rather well. Let me make clear that I'm talking about the post-1964 Winchester Model 94. Mossberg stresses “affordability” as one of the key features of the Model 464, so if you're looking for bluing so deep you can swim around in it and Grade AA Fancy claro walnut, you're going to have to keep waiting or buy a high-end pre-1964 Winchester. Like most Mossbergs, the 464 is a working gun, and if you're looking for more than that you may be living in the wrong decade, if not the wrong century. After spending a few afternoons on the range with the new Model 464, all I can tell you is that it performs as advertised, which is an increasingly rare characteristic for any new product, firearm or otherwise. For the beginner, the once- or twice-a-year deer hunter, the woods bum or the recreational shooter who wants something with more oomph than a .22 for plinking or competition, the Model 464 is an admirable little gun. Related GunDigest Articles Colt Adds New Expanse M4 Model Review: Henry Lever Action Octagon Magnum Gun Review: NULA Model 28 is King of the Mountain Rifles First, the basics: the Model 464 is chambered only in .30-30 Winchester, at least as of this writing. It has a 20-inch round barrel and iron sights, though its receiver is drilled and tapped for scope mounts — not side mounts but top mounts. Unlike Marlin's competing Model 336, the 464 has a straight-grip stock, which has always seemed (to me, anyway) to be more accommodating to various body types than stocks with pistol grips. As to the wood, well, it's that classic “hardwood” we've all come to know so well, and it serves its purpose. One nice touch is the soft, serrated rubber recoil pad that gives the rifle a snug, non-slip feel. Mossberg’s new Model 464 .30-30 is an excellent choice for a youngster’s first deer rifle. Magazine capacity of the Model 464 is 6+1 rounds and, unlike some lever-actions I've fired recently, you don't have to be Charles Atlas to force cartridges into the loading gate. There is no half-cock hammer safety; the only manual safety is an unobtrusive tang slider that lies naturally under the thumb. Some lever fans are going to complain about the safety, just as they did when Marlin introduced the crossbolt safety on its 336-series rifles way back in 1984. To me, a tang safety is much handier than a receiver-mounted crossbolt, and it looks better, too. It's a hammer-block safety, so the trigger will pull and the rebounding hammer will fall even when the safety is engaged. There's also an automatic disconnector safety where the lever meets the lower tang, which is pretty much standard for modern lever-actions. We can all debate the need for a manual safety on a lever rifle, but the way I read the situation, one motivated tort lawyer swings more weight than 1000 mildly displeased consumers. In some respects, the new Mossberg looks like a cross between a Marlin Model 336 and a late-model Winchester 94. The sliding round bolt resembles that of a Marlin, while the open-top receiver resembles that of a Winchester. Unlike the Winchester, however, the bolt is enclosed by two massive integral fore-and-aft rings that are forged in one piece with the receiver proper. The ejection port is similar to that of the Winchester Model 94 Angle Eject, and empties exit it with considerable force at nearly a perfect 45-degree angle, well clear of any scope you'd care to mount. The 464 weighs in at an advertised 6.7 lbs., a few ounces less than the walnut-stocked Model 336, with an overall length of 38.5 inches.

Aimpoint Hosts Celebrity Appearances at the NRA Annual Meetings

Aimpoint Hosts Celebrity Appearances at the NRA Annual Meetings

Aimpoint, the originator and worldwide leader in reflex sight technology, is proud to announce five celebrity guest appearances in their booth at the 2017 NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits in Atlanta, GA, April 28-30 . Aimpoint sights have been chosen by hunters, sport shooters, and professional end-users for over 40 years. This wide spectrum is represented with this year’s guest appearances in the Aimpoint booth #1410 at the NRA Annual Meetings. Returning to the Aimpoint booth are Craig Boddington, renowned hunter, conservationist, and author whose hunting experience spans the globe and Larry Vickers, retired US Army 1st SFOD- Delta combat veteran who now travels the nation as a combat marksmanship instructor and industry consultant. Celebrities joining Aimpoint this year for the first time are John “Tig” Tiegen, Tatiana Whitlock, and Chris Parrish. Co-Author of 13 Hours: The Inside Account of What Really Happened In Benghazi , John “Tig” Tiegen is prominently known for his heroism and bravery during the US Embassy attack in Benghazi on September 11, 2012. He was the most experienced Annex Security Team member for CIA’s GRS and played an essential part of the rapid response to the terrorist attack when Islamic militants attacked the American diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya. Tatiana Whitlock is a nationally recognized firearms instructor, martial arts practitioner, and subject matter expert writer for many firearms related publications. Tatiana has a powerful presence and influential voice in the firearms education and defensive training industry. Mother of two, she is a proud member of the NRA and is a featured instructor on NRATV’s NRA Women, Tips & Tactics, and NRA New Energy, as well as Trigger Time TV and Panteao Productions. Chris Parrish, outdoor personality and World Champion competitive caller, will provide turkey call tips and techniques as well as hunting strategies during four 30-minute sessions at the Aimpoint booth. Parrish is also the engineer behind legendary Knight & Hale game calls and will give away call packages each day. About Aimpoint Inc. Aimpoint produces a complete line of high quality reflex sights for use by military, law enforcement, hunters, and sport shooters. The company also produces electronic fire control systems for use on crew-served weapons. For more information on Aimpoint products, please visit the company’s webpage: www.aimpoint.com .

Using the Bathroom While Carrying Concealed

Using the Bathroom While Carrying Concealed

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s It never fails. You’re running errands and your stomach grumbles, lets loose a little gas, and you know it’s time to a bathroom. Concealed Carry Pants Down, Dave Moore “What do I do with my concealed carry gun?” Unless you’re one of those people who can only perform certain…um…“functions” in your own house, this is a situation you’ll have to deal with sooner or later. Sure, you can leave it (the gun) in the car, but what if someone tries something when you literally have your pants down ? Before you encounter this situation, let’s talk about how to use the bathroom when you’re carrying concealed. Choosing Your Pitstop Location You know what they say…”location, location, location.” This even applies to using the bathroom. Knowing what stores, gas stations, restaurants, and other public places have good bathrooms helps more than you think. Bear with me. When it comes to bathrooms, there are things you will want to look for aside from cleanliness.  If it’s not an emergency and you have some options to choose from, there are some better options than others when it comes to bathrooms. Avoiding Detection For starters, if you can find a bathroom that’s meant to be used one person at a time, this is your best option. You can get in and out without having to worry about anyone seeing your gun. Outhouse If you are in a larger big box store, you can look for the family bathrooms. A lot of times they in a different location than the men’s and women’s bathrooms, so try the back of the store or ask. Family Restroom Sign The reason for using the family bathroom is so it doesn’t have five stalls. Some gas stations have outside bathrooms where you can also be alone, not worrying if someone will catch a glimpse of what’s in your pants. Public Toilet If you need to use a stall where there might me a person next to you, try to get the stall at the end by the wall.  It will help because there are fewer angles for someone to see your weapon. When You Find A Place When you find a location to do your business, it’s time for the real effort to start. It might seem like it’s a simple thing and you do it daily, but carrying a gun changes how you pull your pants up and down. When you need to be less obvious about what’s attached to your belt, you’ll need to pay attention when you drop your drawers. Aside from the extra weight, you will need to pay attention to the direction of the barrel, how much you can see under the stall wall, and what to do when you pull your pants up. Appendix Carry Example Your carry holster should have good retention, so you shouldn’t have to worry about your gun falling out, even if it flips upside down. You should be able to hold your holster upside down with the gun (unloaded for this test) or magazine in it and shake it without the gun or magazine falling out. Many of us also have a carrier for an additional magazine or two. While it’s great to have if something goes down and you need a reload, they get in the way during everyday activities. Mag Carrier, Lag Tactical Knowing that your gun won’t fall out of the holster can stop some of the pants dropping gymnastics you may have thought you’d have to do. Simply unbuckling your belt but keeping tension on the belt will help it from going limp (the belt).  Now that you have control of the loose weapon, you can lower your pants while guiding your holster where you want it to lay. "Concealed Carry Pants" Down, Dave Moore Where your holster and gun lay is a judgement call based on the bathroom you’re in and the stall wall height. If you are a right hand draw and you’re in the first stall with the bathroom entrance door to your right, you may have to cover your weapon or lay it more inside your pants if the stall wall is far up off the floor. Concealed Carry Pants Down Holster to Side, Dave Moore Positioning Your Gun When Seated Positioning your gun, no matter where you are is important; remember the 4 rules of gun safety? However, it’s really important when you are sitting with your gun loosely between your legs resting in your pants. You want to make sure you aren’t pointing it in a direction that could harm someone in the case of an accidental discharge, including yourself. So don’t do this… Concealed Carry Pants Down Gun Pointed, Dave Moore The layout of a bathroom stall leaves few options for this. If you can access the “corner office” you can point it at the wall if it’s not a flimsy drywall and 2×4 wall, because that wouldn’t stop much. The other alternative is to point it back at the toilet base. While it would suck to have to replace a toilet, there is less chance of danger pointing it back at the toilet than other directions in this case.  And this should go without saying but I’ll mention it anyway, don’t point the gun up at you.  Down and away from you is always better. Also, don’t play with your gun while you’re on the throne.  Nothing good can come from it, if you’re bored, play on your phone like the rest of the population, or God forbid… read something. What If It Falls Out If your weapon falls out of your holster while you’re pulling your pants up or down, first of all, don’t panic.  Pick it up and holster it.  Don’t make a big deal of it.  Your gun should not discharge from being dropped. And check out our Best Holsters for Any Way You Carry since the one you used probably wasn’t great. Lots of Holsters, Boondock Saints Your holster should be snug and not let your gun loose unless you want it to come out.  Kydex can lose retention; it shouldn’t, but it can.  If that’s the case, you can usually fix the retention problem pretty easily. What Should I Do If There Is a Accidental Discharge? First thing is, it’s probably good you’re in a bathroom, because it will probably scare the crap out of you.  So, after you wipe, you’ll need to own up to the accident. The first thing is to secure your weapon. It would be a good idea to take the mag out and remove the round in the chamber too just to be safe. Don’t flee the scene . This will look bad and probably break a law making things much worse.  The laws vary from state to state, but you could be in it for a felony if you flee. Police in Restroom Make sure no one is injured. Even though it was unintentional, it’s your gun and bullet, so it’s your responsibility regardless of intent. The key word to this situation is negligent .  Because it was not an intentional discharge , you shouldn’t be negligent. But that’s what the lawyer may use to describe your action, especially if you are in a gun hating area of the country.  I’m not a lawyer, so check your local laws so you know for yourself.  * Update * Some more insight in the comments. Conclusion Of course, most of this is common sense, but to those of you new to concealed carrying you may not think about the simple things you do (or need to do) until it happens. There’s my 7 Things I Wish I Knew Before Concealed Carrying article to help you out too. Plus have you ever thought of concealed carry insurance?  That’s a thing and we recommend the largest provider, the USCCA.  Check out my review of them here . Keep Calm and Concealed Carry On Hopefully this gives you an idea about what could happen and how to avoid the pitfalls of using the bathroom while concealed carrying.  There is a bit more to take into consideration than just dropping your drawers and sitting down. Have you had any AH-HA moments when you’ve tried to use the bathroom while carrying?  Maybe an accidental discharge of your weapon or having a stall-mate catch a glimpse of what you’re packin… in your holster. Let us know how you handled the situation.

Flash Hiders and Accuracy: Here comes the Science

Here’s an Australian study that looked into the effects of flash suppressors on machine gun accuracy (burst dispersion). Australia uses a locally-made variation of the FN Minimi, with some local modifications including, significantly, a parallel-sided rather than tapered barrel, as the F89 in the squad automatic/LMG role. The F89 closely resembles an early (pre-Product Improvement Package) M249 SAW. Muzzle whip was measured by these optical proximity switches, to try to determine why some suppressors were more accurate than others. A test by the Aeronautical and Marine Research Laboratory of the Australian DOD’s Defence Science And Technology Organization looked at flash suppressors’ influence on accuracy. The test mostly looked into dispersion of rapid fire, not cold-bore accuracy, but is extremely interesting. One of the things they discovered: that an adapted FN-MAG flash-hider is superior to the standard Minimi arrangement, at least with respect to accuracy. It has been found that the addition of a flash suppressor from a MAG 58 machine gun Will reduce the size of mean radius dispersion by as much as 41% over a Minimi barrel fitted with a standard flash suppressor, and by 35% over a bare F89 barrel. Some part of that is due to the weight of the flash suppressor: The evidence suggests that the parallel sided F89 barrel is stiffer than the taper ended minimi barrel and that a muzzle mass would reduce flexing in the Minimi barrel but have minimal effect in the F89 barrel. A very interesting finding was that each flash suppressor changed the point of impact of individual rounds in the same direction and amount, regardless of the indexing of the flash suppressor. As everyone’s come to expect from a scientific document, the scientists conclude by suggesting that what is needed is more research. This entry was first posted on weaponsman.com by Hognose . About Hognose Kevin O’Brien was a former Special Forces 11B2S, later 18B, weapons man. (Also served in intelligence and operations jobs in SF). After years magnificent service to his country, Kevin peacefully passed away on April 18th, 2017 from illness. He will be missed in our community and his own.

The 4 Best Cheap Bushcraft Knives – Affordable Knife Reviews 2020 Photo by Troy Bell / CC BY Bushcraft is an art that is so much more than just learning how to survive out in the wilderness (which in fairness is a form of art on its own). Instead, bushcraft is about how you can live out in the wilderness but with very limited resources. In true wilderness, there are no convenience stores and no one there to help you. Rather, you’re on your own and only have what you have on you. This means that you have to make do with both the very limited manmade tools you have and the vast natural resources at your disposal. By way and large, the most important manmade bushcraft tool you can have with you in this case is a bushcraft knife. Your knife has to be up for a multitude of purposes from building shelters and traps to whittling sticks into fire starting strips to cleaning game and so on. While you may believe that you’ll have to spend a lot of money to buy a knife capable of doing each of these things, the reality is that there multitudes of perfectly affordable models available that anyone can buy. Let’s take a look at four of the best cheap bushcraft knives on the market: Szco Supplies Classic Patch Knife SZCO Supplies "Classic Patch Knife" Price: $10.32 Price as of 08/14/2020 16:08 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. This eight-inch stainless steel blade comes attached to a burl wood handle that is held to the tang with brass pins. The Szco Classic Patch Knife sells with a sheath (a must have if you’re planning on packing your knife out in the woods) and is based on the skinning knives that were originally used by trappers and mountain men in the Rocky Mountains. The grip is designed to give you enough length to grab securely so the knife won’t slip in your hands while skinning a kill. The stainless steel blade is a little thicker than some other knives in its same class, but this is good for durability and longevity. Schrade SCHF36 Frontier Full Tang Drop Point Fixed Blade Knife Schrade SCHF36 Frontier 10.4in High Carbon Steel Full Tang "Fixed Blade Knife" with 5in Drop Point and TPE Handle for Outdoor Survival, Camping and Bushcraft Price: $32.97 Price as of 08/14/2020 16:08 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. This is a full-tang knife (meaning the grip wraps around the bottom part of the blade) with a high carbon steel blade, a ring textured handle, a black nylon sheath with a loop to wrap around your belt, and even a sharpening stone. The blade ( see full specs ) itself is a quarter of an inch thick, which is a good width for a survival or bushcraft knife. The grip may be a little too aggressive for people, but it’s not going to be slipping in your hand anytime soon so that’s more important—one of the things that make this one of the best cheap bushcraft knives you can afford. Schrade Schf 36 - Test Watch this video on YouTube

Summary

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